"When Princess Europa was kidnapped by Zeus in bull’s disguise, her father, Agenor, King of Tyre, sent his sons in search of his lost daughter. One of them, Cadmon, sailed to Rhodes. In Delphi he asked the Oracle about his sister’s whereabouts. On that specific point Pythia, true to her habit, was evasive -but she obliged Cadmon with practical advice: "you won’t find her. Better get yourself a cow, follow it and push it forward, don’t allow it to rest; at the spot where it falls from exhaustion, build a town".
Zygmunt Bauman



dijous, de març 14, 2013

'The Speech'

Instead of a long blogpost about 'The Speech', I have taken the press articles I have been reading over the weeks and put all together in a PDF.

Read it here (9 pages).

The key points following the press review:
Pro-European rhetoric: the content of the speech by David Cameron was much more ‘pro-European’ than the potential political scenarios that unsets.
Timing: the calculus made by the Prime Minister is that by 2017 the EU would have
agreed on a new and more integrated institutional design. Such timing is far from being
guaranteed.
A false choice: David Cameron does not contemplate the possibility of losing the political
battle when negotiating a new settlement with Europe. He does not offer any clue about his
position the day of the referendum if he fails to deliver.
Reactions: the business sector and the foreign diplomatic partners of the UK have been
particularly active in pointing the potential difficulties and dangers of the Prime Minister
strategy. In the political arena the Liberal Democrats and the Labour have opposed
Cameron’s plan but refuse –for the moment- to fully engage in leading the ‘pro-European’
side.
National factors?: the rise of the UKIP and the Eurosceptic shift within the Conservatives
might partially explain the strategy of David Cameron.
Fuzziness: David Cameron has only mentioned a couple of specific pieces of legislation
regarding the new relationship. In that sense the ‘audit’ currently conducted under the
supervision of William Hague might offer more insight about the specific content of
negotiation than the speech made by the Prime Minister.

To be continued…